After reading “A Case in Point” at the beginning of Chapter 1 in Sousa and Tomli

by | Mar 13, 2022 | Education

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After reading “A Case in Point” at the beginning of Chapter 1 in Sousa and Tomlinson (2018) and also “A Better Scenario” at the end of the same chapter, reflect on these two contrasting situations. Do so in light of one of the topics from the body of the chapter. Below are some options, but you may choose another as long as it is relevant to concepts presented in the chapter one reading. Consider implications of these concepts to Mrs. Worrell. Elements of Effective Teaching: You may choose to consider how these elements apply to Mrs. Worrell’s situations.
Invitational Environment
Quality Curriculum
Formative Assessment
Responsive Instruction
Flexible Routines
Mindset (Dweck, 2006): You may choose to discuss the type of mindset Mrs. Worrell exhibits.
Growth Mindset
Fixed Mindset
Implications of Brain Research: You may choose one of the following as having the greatest implication on one of Mrs. Worrell’s scenarios.
Learning Profiles
Convergent versus Divergent Thinking
Emotions in Learning
Social Processes
Working Memory versus Long-term Memory
Technology
Brain Plasticity
I HAVE ATTACHED BOTH SECTIONS FOR YOU TO READ BELOW IN ORDER TO COMPLETE THIS DISCUSSION BOARD.
A Case in Point (PLEASE READ)
It was just the first week of school, and already Mrs. Worrell felt tired. Her class enrollment was higher this year than last. The students in front of her came from several different language groups, from a broad spectrum of economic groups, and with a five-year span of achievement in reading and mathematics. Her job was to get all the students ready to pass the same test on the same day under the same conditions. She had nine months to do that. The year stretched ahead of her like a bad movie. She had too many students, virtually no planning time, no one to help in the classroom, a single textbook for each subject, too few supplies, too much content, and a mandate to make sure everyone would look competent on the test that loomed ahead of them all. She looked at the students as they left the room to get on the afternoon school buses. They looked as weary as she felt. She wondered if everyone in the building felt that way.
A Better Scenario (PLEASE READ)
Mrs. Worrell looked at the students as they left her room at the end of a reasonably typical school day at the end of the first week of school. She knew some of the students couldn’t wait to leave the room and others would happily stay on for a longer day. She knew some of the students had understood the ideas they explored that day, others had not, and some had known the content before she began teaching it to them. She knew their lives at home ran the gamut from comfortable and supportive to overly demanding to chaotic to abusive. She knew some of the students flourished when they worked with peers and others preferred working alone—or had no one they could call a friend.
In those students, she saw herself as a young learner—shy, uncertain, and eager to please. She saw her son, who often learned faster than his age-mates and who got weary of waiting for others to learn what he already knew. She saw her daughter, who often needed extra time to learn and who learned best when someone could show her how something worked rather than simply tell her. She knew she needed to create a classroom where there was room for each student to succeed. She wasn’t sure exactly how to do that, but she had some good hunches and the determination to follow them. She was excited to see a new school week begin.

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