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Lit review notes for the writer: Pay attention to the instructions in red.
The lit review has to have a design method section (even sample size needs to be addressed), a design section, a study procedure section, a statistical plan section, etc. (see below).
Tips for a successful lit review:————————————————>
• The lit review gives the reader grounding on the research and why it is needed. The purpose of the lit review is to get everyone reading n the same page. Give a comprehensive overview – what is known about the topic and what is NOT known. Set this part up for the Rationale section.
• The lit review establishes the author as an expert. It lays out what is being studied. What is the theoretical framework for why you are studying what you are studying? Make sure the theory flows through; it must match the methodology (qualitative), analysis, and design methods.
• APA FORMAT, ABSOLUTELY NO PLAGIARISM, NEEDS ABOUT 25-30 SOURCES (some are attached) – REALLY HAS NO LIMIT
• A lit review adds value to what is being done (the study)
• Do not cherry-pick, and do not leave out articles because you disagree with the theoretical framework. You CAN NOT leave out key works. You include the article but mention why you are clarifying in your rationale.
• A lit review does include contrary articles of other authors’ approaches to findings.
• IF THE LIT REVIEW IS FLAWED, OTHER SECTIONS WILL BE FLAWED! Most lit reviews are underdeveloped, and this is not good!
• A lit review should not look like an amputated annotated bibliography.
• A lit review Should have original interpretational perspectives.
• A lit review has to be up to date. It can have older articles but should have newer articles as well.
• A lit review should be comprehensive, systematic, and current.
• Do not cite articles over and over again!
• Sometimes you cite articles in different sections, but it is rare.
A lit review should go from general ——> to specific.
A typical background section should have sprouting studies.
In a lit review, it should b the following.
• Intro – scope & structure
• Background
• Narrower category of research
• Categories/studies closest to your research (leads to your research question)
• Hypothesis statement

• Then lit review leads to the last section: the rationale and purpose. The rationale is NOT a summary!
• The lit review should allow a reader to know why they are reading the lit review – they should know what will be done and why.
• A lit review is a bridge to the rationale.
• A lit review tells what has been done, where the gap is, and the phenomenon is happening to why I am doing the research – why I wrote this?
• A lit review restates what and why I am doing this at the end of it.
• Need quality source material.
REMEMBER **WHEN YOU REACH THE POINT OF SATURATION (WHEN YOU FIND NO NEW INFO, A LIT REVIEW IS DONE!**
THIS IS A QUALITATIVE RESEARCH STUDY
Research Question:
What are the perceptions of overturning Roe v. Wade on females who live in Louisiana?
Hypotheses:
The overturning of Roe v. Wade will negatively affect females.
This is what I have so far. This needs to be expanded, and it all needs to make sense. Please add to this and how you see fit. This has to show why we are researching what researching.
Background Information (add to this)
Roe v. Wade was a 1973 court case in the United States. The Supreme Court ruled that certain state restrictions on abortion were unjustified and incompatible with the Constitution. The Court argued that many Texas legislation that criminalized abortion several times violated women’s constitutional right to privacy (Wade, 2017). Based on the Due Process Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment’s Liberty Clause, the Supreme Court identified this legislation as having a connection to the freedom guarantee of the Fourteenth Amendment. This provision declares that “…nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty or property, without due process of law” (Coen-Sanchez et al., 2020). On June 24, 2022, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade based on these facts. The first verdict in Roe vs. Wade overturned several state and federal abortion regulations, culminating in lengthy national disputes over whether abortion should be considered legal and to what degree it should be permitted. Similarly, there have been discussions on who is obligated to evaluate the legality of the procedure and the role of religious and moral perspectives from a political standpoint (Adkins, 2017). In addition, there were discussions over the methodology the Supreme Court should have utilized when conducting constitutional arbitration.
Roe vs. Wade was filed in 1969 by Norma McCorvey, better known as “Jane Roe,” when she was pregnant and desired an abortion. However, as a resident of Texas, she was prohibited by law from performing an abortion. Except in cases when it is judged necessary to preserve the mother’s life, Texas has made abortion illegal. Henry Wade, the local district attorney, was sued by Roe. She asserted that the Texas abortion laws violated the Constitution (Ziegler, 2018). In this case, the Northern U.S. District Court decided in favor of Roe, triggering an appeal to the Supreme Court from numerous parties disputing the ruling. The Supreme Court ruled in 1973 that the Fourteenth Amendment’s Due Process Clause provides a significant right to privacy. This Clause was explained to preserve a woman’s right to an abortion.
In addition, the Court ruled that this right is not absolute, requiring a balance between the right to abortion and the government’s interest in protecting prenatal life and women’s health (Hull & Hoffer, 2010). The Court issued a pregnant trimester schedule to address competing claims on the subject. The schedule was developed to supervise all abortion rules in the United States (Harris, 2022). Abortion rights were likewise necessary, necessitating that all courts evaluate contested abortion restrictions using methods of severe scrutiny. This examination is regarded as the strictest court scrutiny in the United States.
In 2022, the Supreme Court voted to overturn Roe vs. Wade when considering Dobbs vs. Jackson Women’s Health Organization (Perry & Jipping, 2021). The overturning was based on the notion that the right to abortion was not one of the nation’s vital foundations or traditions, nor was it deemed a fundamental right during the 1868 adoption of the Due Process Clause. In addition, it proclaimed the mandate unknown in the nation until the Roe v. Wade decision. Several historians refuted this notion, criticizing it with diverse alternative viewpoints (Coen-Sanchez et al., 2022). During the 1868 ratification of the Due Process Clause, it was contended that many rights, including interracial marriage, same-sex marriage, and contraception, did not exist.
Consequently, this Court deemed these rights unlawful based on the reasoning of the Dobbs Majority (Greenhouse & Siegel, 2010). Thus, anti-abortion movements applauded the ruling in the United States, while abortion rights movements condemned it. Nonetheless, several foreign leaders and international observers criticized the decision to overturn Roe vs. Wade.
Literature Review. . (This needs to be expanded. The design method following other study parts should not be the start of the literature review – it should be more towards the end)
Study Design. (needs lit review for this section)
Study Subject Selection. )needs lit review for this section)
Study Intervention (needs lit review for this section)
Study Procedure (can add to this or take away if you do so -need to know what was omitted and added to make it better, has to tie in with the rest). The proposed research investigates the perceptions of Louisiana women regarding the reversal of Roe v. Wade. Two surveys will help facilitate the qualitative analysis. In this regard, there is a need to focus on the research procedure employed. Thus, it can be noticed that the study technique relates to the condition intended to inform the audience reading the article about how the data were obtained most effectively, where the chronological order of events is evident. In this context, two research publications focusing on abortions and other relevant topics are examined to explain why this study technique was implemented and its relevance to the current study.
In the first research conducted by Raifman et al. (2022), the emphasis is placed on the coverage of how data were obtained, how the sample was recruited, and who collected the data. The detailed strategy outlines how events transpired. The study examined the parameters associated with public opinions regarding the legality of self-managed abortion (SMA) and legal access to abortion. The importance of conducting the national survey as the optimal method for gathering a representative sample of English- and Spanish-speaking women aged 18 to 49 across the United States was emphasized.
The framework for data collecting was based on Opposes Public Affairs’ KnowldegePanel. Researchers selected this method because they anticipated obtaining both unadjusted and adjusted multinomial logistic regression estimates, the purpose of which was to determine, among other factors, characteristics linked with the belief that SMA should not be illegal. The collection of data occurred in August 2017.
Female-identified members of the GfK-administered KnowldgePanel, a nationally representative and probability-based online household panel, provided the data for this study. After conducting a pilot survey with 25 participants, the GfK asked qualified panel members to complete the 53-item survey. The sample for statistical analysis consisted of 7,022 individuals who had completed the online survey. This number represented fifty percent of the 14,151 women who had been contacted for the panel.
Earlier research by Swartz et al. (2020) similarly employed the survey method to acquire data. It is a research that examined women’s understanding of abortion restrictions in their state. The study was designed and presented as a cross-sectional study including 18-49-year-old Spanish- and English-speaking women from across the United States. Members were recruited using the GfK KnowldegePanel. Participants were prompted to take the survey by receiving emails in their selected languages.
Between January and February 2019, the researchers initiated two pilot trials. Participants were informed that participation in the survey was optional. The research was based on a 41-item questionnaire. Emphasis has been placed on electronically transmitting the survey to 2,223 women. 1,057 respondents (48%) finished the survey, while 14 were disqualified for skipping more than fifty percent of the questions. After weighing, the analytic sample contained 1,041 women.
This study’s research questions focused on state abortion legislation, abortion misconceptions, pregnancy and abortion experience, and personal perspectives and experiences with abortion. Consequently, the two investigations by Swartz et al. (2020) and Raifman et al. (2022) have focused on using surveys as the essential research method for gathering data when the order of events is evident. In addition, they described how the samples were acquired and who collected the data. This proposed study would employ a comparable methodology to guarantee that it accomplishes its purpose of investigating and evaluating the perspectives of Louisiana women about the reversal of Roe v. Wade.
Statistical Plan Section: (needs lit review for this section)- Using the sentiment analysis technique and the software Qualtrics to analyze the qualitative data and create the survey.
Rationale and Purpose (this needs to be completed -make sure the rationale is sound and includes this in the lit review in the rationale section of this lit review.

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